History is made up of a diverse montage of 


triumphs, missteps and tragedies.



History can honor and provide perspectives


 of our past and ground us in our roots of who we 


are and where we came from. Our true history can 


reveal fascinating nuggets of truth and moments in 


time that gives us deeper and more meaningful 


insights of our ancestral past and our true identity.


Extracting lessons from the past helps us to better 


understand how past societies, systems, ideologies, 


cultures, etc., were built. 



History offers a broad range of accumulated 


experiences that can provide a wellspring of insights 


into our present and future. It paints a detailed picture 


of how society got to where we are today.



Ecclesiastes 1:9 is the origin of what has become a


 common proverb, “There’s nothing new under the 


sun.” The verse reads: “What has been will be again,


 what has been done will be done again; there is 


nothing new under the sun.”


History helps us develop a greater understanding of


 ourselves and others, and it provides the necessary 


tools needed to learn from and apply lessons of the 


past to our own lives.

The different layers of history can help us to know 


who we are, what we don't care to repeat, and what 


we can improve upon so that we may leave future


 generations alert, awake, and empowered.

Wisdom of the Egyptians and 


What They Created 


* Medicine – 


Basis of the mummification processes.

 



* Astronomy:


Basis of the 12-month calendar, which we use today. 




* Mathematics:


Development of Geometry to build the pyramids. 




* Literature & Arts:


Tells about Egyptian life “Tale of Sinuhe.” 




* Painting & Sculpture:


Portrays and tells of what was important. 




* Egyptians also created:


 Black Ink, 


Paper, 


Ox-drawnplows,


Organized labor, 


Boat Sails


 and 


Hieroglyphics as the first system of writing.

Our collective past, from the



 first civilizations, the middle 



ages and into the modern era are




overflowing with astounding




discoveries of strong, faithful,




fearless souls.


May we hold dear these under-


appreciated determined souls, their 


momentous milestones, contributions, 


achievements, praiseworthy legacy, 


and great examples of virtue. 


We are standing on the shoulders



 of giants!

To understand the present, 


we must learn from the past.


Embracing black culture and identity.


The Mbalantu



Women of



 Africa 


and their floor-length 


natural hair tradition.

Near the Southern tips of Angola, reside the Mbalantu 

tribes of Namibia. At the age of twelve, young girls in 

Mbalantu tribes begin preparing their hair for the

 headdress. They cover their hair with a thick layer of 

finely ground tree bark of the omutyuula tree. This 

mixture is applied to improve hair growth. Within

 a few years, the thick fat-mixture will be loosened so 

that the hair is visible. Fruit pips of the bird plum will

be attached to the hair ends with the aid of sinew strings.

The black butterfly



 represents change,



transition, freedom 



and rebirth

Lewis Howard Latimer 


(September 4, 1848 – December 11, 1928) 


Lewis Howard Latimer was a Black American inventor 


and patent draftsman. His inventions included an 


evaporative air conditioner, an improved process for 


manufacturing carbon filaments for light bulbs, and an 


improved toilet system for railroad cars.

According to Lewis Howard Latimer's Biography:

In 1880, Hirman Maxim, Chief Engineer and Electrician for the United States Electric Lighting Company, who was very impressed with Latimer’s talents as a draftsman, hired him. Latimer took this opportunity to learn about the electric industry. During his tenure with Maxim, he invented an electric lamp with an improved carbon filament for light bulbs(1881).

In 1885, he began his association with Thomas Edison, serving as an engineer, chief draftsman, and expert witness on the Board of Patent Control in gathering evidence against the infringement of patents held by General Electric and Westinghouse. He was named an Edison Pioneer in 1918, an elite group of men who worked for Edison.

Latimer married Mary Wilson on 10 December 1873, and they had two children, Emma Jeannette, born in 1883, and Louise Rebecca, born in 1890.

Notable Patents and Contributions

  1. 147,363: Water closet for railroad cars (1874)
  2. 247,097: Improvement to electric lamp (1881)
  3. 252,386: Process for manufacturing carbon filament (1882)
  4. 255,212 Arc light: globe support (1882)
  5. 334,078: Apparatus for cooling and disinfecting (1886)
  6. 557,076: Device for locking hats, coats and umbrellas on hanging racks (1895)
  7. 781,890: Lamp fixture (1910)

In his patent role, he was responsible for preparing the mechanical drawings for Alexander Graham Bell’s patent application for his telephone. Thomas Edison took note of his work for Bell and on the light bulb and hired him in 1884. Latimer, in fact, holds the distinction of being the only African American member of the Edison Pioneers.

He continued to work on electric lighting, and in 1890 published Incandescent Electric Lighting, a technical engineering book that became a standard guide for lighting engineers.

In his patent role, he was responsible for preparing the mechanical drawings for Alexander Graham Bell’s patent application for his telephone. Thomas Edison took note of his work for Bell and on the light bulb and hired him in 1884. Latimer, in fact, holds the distinction of being the only African American member of the Edison Pioneers.

He continued to work on electric lighting, and in 1890 published Incandescent Electric Lighting, a technical engineering book that became a standard guide for lighting engineers.


The Reemergence 


of 


Black Culture

Everything we do flows 



from the heart.  

 


It is our prayer God will,


 in His astounding ways


revolutionize the human


 heart!


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